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Safe Practice of Essential Oils

Pure essential oils are highly concentrated aromatic liquids. Once distilled from the plant, their properties become very pronounced. Although the majority of essential oils prove to be non-hazardous as we use them in aromatherapy, it is still paramount to have clear guidelines and labelling which provides warnings and applications for use.

The overall general warnings as set out by the TGA, Therapeutic Goods Administration in Australia are as follows. These guidelines for use appear on all In Essence packaging.

ADULTS ONLY
ESSENTIAL OILS SHOULD ALWAYS BE DILUTED
NOT TO BE USED NEAT ON THE SKIN
NOT TO BE TAKEN
KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
CONSULT YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL IF SYMPTOMS PERSIST

All essential oils are much stronger than their herb/plant counterpart. After distillation certain properties of the oil are very pronounced and need to be used with caution and in some cases best avoided altogether during pregnancy. Certain oils, such as Lemongrass are very stimulating; some, such as Juniper Berry are diuretics while others, such as Clary Sage can induce menstruation. Some even affect hormones, such as Rose Otto. The oils not recommended for use on the body (topically) during the full term of Pregnancy include: Basil, Clary Sage, Cedarwood, Geranium, Jasmine, Juniper Berry, Lemongrass, Marjoram, Peppermint, Rosemary and Rose Otto.

Certain essential oils can cause skin photosensitisation when exposed to uv rays and are best avoided in direct sunlight for at least 8 hours after application. These include the citrus peel oils after they have been cold expressed: Bergamot, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime, Mandarin and Orange.